Pierre Frick Pinot Blanc 2010

Pierre Frick Pinot Blanc 2010

Pedaling fast along a downhill curve I approach Bahler Farm with the bike’s computer reading 51 kph.

CAUTION: COW CROSSING. I squeeze the brake levers.

My lungs need air, but an early evening mix of July humidity with the permeating smell of cow shit deters me from opening my mouth to breathe: it’s nose only.

pierre-frick-pinot-blanc-2010-v1aBetween me, dinner and a bottle of Pierre Frick Pinot Blanc chilling in the refrigerator is one hill and a handful of miles which I plan on ripping through at 100 strokes per minute. A salty elixir of sweat and old sun block runs down my face and onto my lip somehow stirring my appetite.

On the plate tonite, it’s steamed rice, spicy beef with organic garden peppers, home grown bean sprouts & garlic, pan-fried tofu with chives. I’m starving, so let’s uncork the Frick and give it a roll:

Tasting Notes:

A wine of riveting clarity, redolent with apple, orange blossom, bread crust. Lightly mineral and a touch of residual sugar at just the right level so as to welcome the spiciness of food in a grand way. Fleshy on the palate, gently-reviving acidity. Finishes with licks of Crete thyme honey and pistachio. WowWowWow !

Food Pairing Suggestions:

Spicy Asian dishes for sure, can’t miss. You won’t be disappointed when pairing this wine with most any seafood. Served with lobster risotto it would be magnificent, I suspect. I actually have a craving to try this wine with a proper tuna melt served on good toasted, buttered bread. Quiche and salad. Soft cheeses like Muenster or young Gouda.

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La Maialina Chianti 2008

La Maialina Chianti 2008

“You’re such a little pig”.

In some company, well … that could be a bad thing 😉

When speaking of Chianti, however, that reference has, in my mind, forever changed to indicate a very, very good thing indeed.

la-maialina-2008-ver2La Maialina Chianti – so named to honor the Cinta Senese la maialina or “little pig” native to Tuscany – has made sure of that.

This wine was notable and welcome company in a mixed case of 12 that I took along on holiday. 4 weeks later, I find myself still thinking about how much I enjoyed it.

From what I can discern, oenologist Attilio Pagli works his La Maialina magic on bulk juice purchased from one of Tuscany’s top estates.

Tasting Notes:

Tons of personality, vibrant fruit, dried flowers, earth, tobacco. Dark-toned, rich palate with nicely balanced lightness / softness / intensity. Good acidity sets the wine at attention. Finishes with some floral / mineral complexity that leaves you wondering why other more expensive wines aren’t delivering quality to match this little pig. Perhaps the best wine I’ve ever tasted in the under-$10 category.

Food Pairing Suggestions:

This wine is great and agreeable table company sporting a structure that works well with beef, pork, chicken, duck, even lamb. Cooled down a bit, I wouldn’t hesitate to serve this wine with sushi, hand-cut maki rolls or selected seafood. Non-meat eaters might consider pizza, earthy-flavored pasta or risotto, grilled mushroom caps and cheeses; braised or roasted root vegetables. Desiring something altogether different you say? Try baked potato skins stuffed with a mixture of fork-mashed potato, cooked bits of bacon and mushroom, topped off with cheese. A few minutes under the broiler will get them nicely browned.

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